Tag Archives: opioids

Kratom Recall Due to Salmonella Expands Nationwide

kratom recall

Recently, the Centers for Disease Control notified the public that a salmonella outbreak caused by Kratom had prompted a recall of the product. Kratom products sold under brand names including Botany Bay, Enhance Your Life and Divinity by Divinity Products Distribution are all part of the voluntary recall. Kratom is often touted as an opioid substitute that can help people with a variety of issues, from addiction and chronic pain to anxiety and inflammation. The supplement, which is currently legal, is a plant native to southeast Asia that has become more popular in recent years due to its easy availability on the internet.

The Oregon Health Authority asked people to stop using kratom last week when testing found salmonella bacteria in several product samples. Four people in Oregon have already gotten sick from the bad batches they consumed.

The Food and Drug Administration issued a “voluntary destruction and recall” for the kratom supplements distributed nationwide under the brands mentioned earlier. If you own products included in the kratom recall, it is most appropriate to throw them away or even use them as compost, according to the FDA.

“There are currently no FDA-approved therapeutic uses of kratom, and importantly, the FDA has evidence to show that there are significant safety issues associated with its use,” federal regulators told the media in a news release. The DEA recently announced that kratom works similarly to prescription opioids, and has caused deaths in the US due to heart issues, anaphylaxis, and other complications. Kratom is often referred to as a type of “snake oil” supplement, with vendors and users claiming it can cure everything from the pain of arthritis to mental health issues and even addiction itself.

While used to help opioid users detox from heroin and other deadly opioids, Kratom has few studies to show its effectiveness, and there have been no studies to determine whether it is addictive or not. Users who take the drug often say there are no ill effects, although there are dozens of anecdotes online of people who have trouble ceasing Kratom after using it for a few months or more. Headaches are one of the most common complaints of people who are attempting Kratom cessation.

If you or somebody you love is taking Kratom as a supplement, and you don’t think you can stop on your own, there is help available. Addiction treatment can help you cease to use in a therapeutic, calm environment where you can work on reclaiming your own life. Medication-assisted treatment may be helpful, but this is something that you and your treatment center will need to weigh based on your health conditions and patterns of use.

Fake Street Pills Made With Deadly Opiates Now Common

overdose on fake street pills

People addicted to Oxycontin often resort to desperate measures, including buying their pills on the street. Unfortunately, addicted persons who buy these pills are discovering that they’re fake street pills. They are now being linked to carfentanil and cyclopropyl fentanyl overdoses in New Jersey and across the country.  New Jersey is just one of many states that has experienced deadly incidents of street pills – typically sold as Oxycontin or Hydrocodone — giving their users more than they bargained for.

Luckily, in Holmdel and Long Branch New Jersey, investigators were able to seize the pills before anyone got hurt – as far as they know, anyway. (It takes months for a state Bureau of investigation to tally the figures that include deaths from any illicit drugs.) The seizure was made last week, and the oxycodone pills were found to not contain oxycodone at all. In fact, they contained carfentanil, a synthetic opiate that is 10,000 times as strong as morphine. The drug is so strong that a non-drug user can experience an overdose if just a speck or two is absorbed through their skin. It’s used to sedate elephants and is entirely unsafe for people.

Some of the fakes seized in New Jersey also contained cyclopropyl fentanyl, which has no known medical use for humans or animals and is said to be about 50 times stronger than heroin.

Cyclopropyl fentanyl is also a dangerous new trend among street pills fakes – like carfentanil, it’s a powerful opioid. While recently found in New Jersey, this drug is tied to several mass overdose incidents across the US. Georgia linked the drug to an incident that flooded emergency rooms for 48 hours last July, with several fatal overdoses that never made it to the hospital.

Fake pills are often sold on the street, and US authorities suspect they originate in China. The carfentanil and cyclopropyl fentanyl pills found in Monmouth County, New Jersey were meant to masquerade as Oxycodone, and both were a bright white pill marked A/215, the same number that prescription drug website show as Oxycodone.

There is virtually no way for drug users to differentiate fake street pills from real pills, although sometimes they crumble easily or have a tinge of yellow, according to authorities.

These powerful and deadly opiates have also found their way into heroin as well.

If someone you know and love is addicted to prescription painkillers or opioids, it’s important to encourage them and/or their friends to carry naloxone, a lifesaving opiate antagonist that can reverse an overdose. Let them know there is help whenever they are ready, and encourage them to contact a treatment or 12-step hotline to explore their options. Sometimes a list of phone numbers kept in their wallet may be effective to help them when they’re desperate and in need of a person who understands what they’re going through.

People do get clean, and they do recover.

Opioids and the War Against Drugs in America – 20 Years Later

The highly under-published problem of opioid prescription drug abuse actually is one of the main causes of our ongoing drug war.  This drug war is currently being waged locally and nearby is reaching fever pitches in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.

Opioid painkillers are a class of psychoactive substances that are mainly used for pain management and include codeine, hydrocodone, and oxycodone (among others).

Today, the extreme consumption of prescription opioids greatly surpasses that of any of our previous drug crises by all measures and accounts, including heroin in the 1960s and 1970s, and crack cocaine in the 1980s and 1990s.

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